Hypocritical Hyperbole

The Abomination of Obama's Nation

Why the current system of capitalism isn’t set up to collapse on itself September 9, 2012

Keep in mind that profits don’t include money being put back into the operation of the business. 100% of that pie graph is the money left over AFTER that, which the ruling class are totally at liberty to redistribute more fairly if they wanted to. Too bad they don’t want to and never will. ~ joamette

That’s the thing people don’t understand about current finances and capitalism and all that. It isn’t just that these companies are making more money than they ever have before (which they are). Revenue growth is a thing for a lot of these people. Because of capitalism forcing smaller companies out of business more and more and individual citizens having  less of an ability to do  things for themselves due to space and cost effectiveness and time and education and a billion other reasons (make clothes, grown their own food, cook, provide their own entertainment locally, and a billion other things we don’t ever think about) more money is going into these large companies that can muscle their way into areas and completely disrupt local economics. They have no choice but to get bigger as smaller stores have no choice but to get smaller. The thing is, as they grow they can then afford to pay their employees less, offer less benefits or worse and cheaper benefits, force them into more hours if salaried or less if hourly and there’s no repercussions because the employees can’t afford to quit for even a week to find another job and every other similar place will treat them the same. So these large corporations are increasing their revenue and putting less and less into the company. It is only going to get worse as we continue to export this system of economics across the globe. The thing is, it won’t ever collapse. People talk about how it’s unsustainable, but it’s an infinitely sustainable practice. There are always people who need to work and are willing to do it for less money and there are always countries with laws that allow people to work for way little bits of money. It’ll change from country to country over a time, but the system won’t ever collapse under it’s own weight because the institution always wins. It has built in ways to protect itself form itself.

Not just that, but these fuckbrained republicans keep voting to increase corporate abilities to do shit like this. The whole point of capitalism and the free market is to exploit the most exploitable people and move on. Look at US history. White folks showed up and worked on getting Native Americans to work as slaves, then they tried to kill them off in a land grab and brought over a bunch of African slaves to do all the work. Then they had them keep doing the work through private prisons and convict leasing and a whole bunch of fun stuff. They got the Chinese to build railroads and snatched up all the gold spots from the Mexicans and made the ones who were suddenly not in their own country anymore dig it all up. They got black people to literally build all of the infrastructure that runs through the south and mid atlatnic U.S. Now we’re using cheap Chinese labor to make clothes and stuff way cheaper than we can afford to now. We’ve exploited just about the entire continent of Africa for minerals and labor. It won’t ever stop because a majority of people in the world refuse to believe that this is actually how it is, and when you bring it up get angry and defensive about it and claim it never happened.

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Writing about racism in Historical Fiction July 12, 2012

Filed under: Posts From the Internet — Micah Griffin @ 19:41
Tags: , , , , ,

There was a post here http://justinelarbalestier.com/blog/2012/07/13/writing-about-racism-in-the-past/

it’s about writing about racism in the past. The author brings up some questions, and I wrote a rambling response almost as long as their original post. Because that’s what I do.

The first thing I think about after reading this is why is it so important to tell this story? Why do we need another story revolving around racist white people? The reason I don’t read historical fiction is because a great majority of it either completely ignores how awful the time periods were (because most of these stories are written for white western audiences by white western people) for people of color (or any other marginalized group). The people who are so often the main focus of these stories are villains. They’re people who would want to see me killed for looking at them in the face. They don’t think I’m a person or deserving of any sort of equality or human rights. So they are bad guys. When you look at post reconstruction writings you’ll find that a great number of abolitionists regret ending slavery. A lot of “anti-racist” whites of the 1930s were actually extraordinarily racist. Paternalistic is putting it kindly. At the best, the biggest leaders in equality among white people were doing it for personal gain on their parts.
Going back and dealing with regency fiction, most writers don’t ever touch on imperialism and colonialization. Most of these books ignore the fact that anyone but white people even existed in England (or any other western European) countries at the time. It’s a big horrible mess that no one really deals with.
The thing is, historical fiction is most often by white people for white people and that’s where most of the problems come in. Writers of this type of fiction are not usually challenged to think about the implication of everything going on and push themselves to do more work. When they do research, most of the source materials are clearly things written by racist white folks. That’s the only reason we look at Queen Victoria and America’s founding fathers with any sort of fondness. That and we don’t actually care about racism.
So when it comes to writing historically, it seems most writers can’t help themselves but throw their own racism into the mix. This even happens when they catch themselves trying to be progressive. It’s not just in the depiction of characters of color, but in the depiction of the world itself. It’s how exclusionary the world is, or throw away lines about American Progress or the greatness of the Industrial Revolution where it is entirely obvious that the writer has forgotten about slavery, colonialization, genocide, convict leasing, sterilization programs, introducing diseases into populations, Native American relocation projects, and a host of other issues. People just don’t think about these things and it comes through.
White people should really avoid using the N-word at all costs. If historical accuracy is that important to you, cool, but I have to wonder about what kind of person you are. If that sort of historical accuracy is that important then it’s clear you don’t want me anywhere near your writings. There should be no conflict here. That was wrong of them. There better not have been a single historical inaccuracy in the rest of their book if that’s the length they’re going to go to.
What it comes down to is this, you have to ask yourself why you’re writing something and think about the impact that it has. What’s the point of doing what you’re doing. Why aren’t there people of color in this story? Why are there so many white people? What are these white people doing? When I talk about how cool these white people are why am I not mentioning the awful events that got them to the place they are. Stuff like this. Just general “does this actually need to be written?” stuff.